Is God a trinity? Debate Response #1

It’s been a few months now since my debate with Joshua Lovell on the trinity.  I’ve now re-listened to the debate in full about 3 times and pieces of it many more times since its upload on both of our youtube channels.  You can view, listen, or download that debate on the trinity from my other post which is here.

I figured it’s time to start giving some more full responses to issues that I perceive from the trinitarian perspective in this debate.   After much time and listening you get to analyze the arguments of each of us much more clearly given that there’s no timer on your responses.

I’m not talking about addressing word mishaps either.  I want to address actual given arguments that were fairly clear.  I’m not perfect in speech–I know I made word mistakes in my debate with Josh.  There’s even times you could piece together a couple of my responses from various areas and make it look like I contradicted myself.   If I can catch that in myself, I’m sure others can. We were both nervous and trying to do our best to articulate our positions I believe.  But those aren’t strong arguments against either position.  This is sort of the issue with debate because it usually becomes more about winning rather than the truth.  I don’t believe our debate fell into that trap, but even when analyzing one another’s words during and after debate I don’t want to fall into that trap now by nitpicking what were likely just words jumbling rather than clearer arguments from my opponent.


 

So, part one.  What did I wish to address that I think was a clear problem with my opponent’s position?  My first thought was irrelevancy.  This is usually the basic nature of most fallacies, answering irrelevantly to an argument.  I believe this occurred right off the bat in my opponent’s first rebuttal.  After our openings Josh stated in his first rebuttal:

“I affirm as a trinitarian and one hundred percent agree that the Father is God, no problem with that. [I] have no problem saying that Jesus has a God. No problem with that either…  Of course Jesus, being a perfect man would have a God.  Would you expect Jesus to be [an] atheist?. Of course not.”

The problem with this response is it is irrelevant to the points from my opening and only restates my argument.  It does not answer the argument.  Josh and I of course both agree that the Father is God.  That was never my argument in my opening nor the entirety of the debate.  My argument was that the Father is God exclusively.  That last word is key and I gave many texts where the context clearly defines that one God as the Father exclusively in my opening.

Our debate subject was regarding “Is God a trinity?”  So the debate should focus on whether or not that word “God” is defined as a trinity from the Bible from my understanding.  I gave many texts in my opening that showed how the word “god” is defined from beginning to end with reference to angels, rulers/kings and even at times God’s own people in other authority positions.   My position was clearly defined in my opening and my opponent did not deal with the exclusivity texts of the capital “G”  word “God” clearly referring to the Father alone as the Almighty and Supreme God who alone created everything and everything lives and moves by His will.  That can be read in Acts 17 in Paul’s preaching in the Areopagus.  My opponents response was only to affirm that the Father is God, which was irrelevant to my arguments from the Scripture.

Next my opponent stated “Would you expect Jesus to be [an] atheist? Of course not”  I’ve heard this from James White too in his debates.  This is not an argument, it’s just a restatement of my argument itself and again an irrelevant response.  If we break it down it can clearly be seen.   Well, what is an atheist?  An atheist is someone who lacks a belief in God, and clearly by that position does not submit himself/herself to a God.  In other words, the atheist does not have a God.   So to say Jesus isn’t an atheist is to say Jesus has a God.  That’s just a restatement of my argument but it avoids answering the argument.  The argument was not that Jesus was not perfect, the argument was that Jesus’ God was one person[using trinitarian terminology].  The argument was that the God of Jesus is the Father alone.  The God of Jesus is not a tri-une God.  My opponent only restated my argument and avoided answering it directly.  Implicitly my opponent also admitted that within his own trinitarian doctrine he has at least two different gods.  Jesus has a God within his doctrine who is not triune, and at the same time there is also a triune God who is *not* the God of Jesus.  Let me make that clear again, there are two different gods within the trinitarian doctrine by my opponent’s admission: 1) the Father alone who is the God of Jesus and 2) the triune God which is Father, Son and Spirit.   That’s two different gods, they are not each other.  This should be more obvious since #1 is my biblical unitarian position and #2 is Josh’s trinitarian position.  We wouldn’t have even been debating if this weren’t an admitted difference between our positions on how to define “God” biblically.

 

I plan to make this continual responses series from now on to try to address my own responses and my opponent’s responses in our debate.  I hope others will continue to study and search out these issues as I try to elaborate the issues in the trinitarian position and also clarify my position for readers and listeners of the debate.

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Biblical Unitarian: Jesus is a (biblical) unitarian

Hello All,

 

Figured I should update this again and make a short explanation.  I will likely link another video in here again soon with a fuller update as to how I came out of trinitarianism to actually FOLLOWING Jesus and becoming a (biblical) unitarian.  I must make that distinction because in the USA, “unitarianism” is almost automatically linked to the “unitarian universalism” church(meaning that all believers are united in one faith and all have salvation)… if you can even call it that.   This type of “unitarianism” I believe is false, yet the biblical unitarianism is strongly founded upon the Scriptures and believing in them.  Bibilical unitarian is only used in contradistinction between trinitarians (and binitarians).

So what does a biblical unitarian believe in general?  Well for starters, that “one” actually MEANS “one.”  It’s quite simple, they believe the same Sh’ma that Jesus quoted in Mark 12:28-34 coming from Deuternomy 6:4.

 

“Hear O Israel, The LORD our God, the LORD is one” – Jesus, Mark 12:29

 

Notice that “our”—it should be pretty important to know that Jesus was under the Law of Moses, not just quoting it for giggles as some might like to say.  But more on that another time.

We can get into other discussions and explanations later as to why no other possible view other than biblical unitarianism fulfills this text in its historical and immediate context.  That means that trinitarians, oneness, and binitarians all must vacuum this verse out of it’s historical and immediate context to uphold their view and eisegetically interpret it.

But on to the simplicity, the biblical unitarian stands on the whole of Scripture and tons of clear contextual verses that show that the Father alonealone… is the one and only true and living God.  No one else, “One” truly means “one.”

Hopefully that’s enough to begin explaining what I believe and why I came to believe it.  I hope to make more posts and explanations why soon enough.

And remember, your Messiah, Jesus(Yeshua) is a Jewish unitarian. Don’t condemn him with your doctrine, or your doctrine is surely wrong!

God bless,

Sean